ETHICAL EGGS
NO corn, soy, wheat, fish meal, coconut, flax or other toxic fillers.
 
Ethical Eggs are superior in nutrient-dense DHA, Vitamin E &  Ωmega-3 values, and they are in very high demand. We collect fresh eggs 2-X-daily and they are available "FRESH DAILY".
 
RESEARCH SHOWS 
Twice as much vitamin E and long-chain omega-3 fats, more than double the total omega-3 fatty acids and, that less than half the ratio of omega-6 to, omega-3 fatty acids, with, Vitamins A and E concentrations at 38 percent higher.

1/4 less saturated fat
2/3 more vitamin A
Two times more omega-3 fatty acids
Three times more vitamin E
Seven times more beta carotene

DHA (DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), an omega-3 fatty acid that plays a key role in infant brain and eye development and adult health).

Interestingly, research shows that supplementing egg-layers with commercial or standard (including certified organic) lay mash-feeds, will likely result in reduced omega-3 fatty acid and, lower vitamin A and E concentrations in eggs.
Mounting Evidence for Free-Range Eggs - Link to Mother Earth News
• In 1974, the British Journal of Nutrition found that pastured eggs had 50 percent more folic acid and 70 percent more vitamin B12 than eggs from factory farm hens.
• In 1988, Artemis Simopoulos, co-author of The Omega Diet, found pastured eggs in Greece contained 13 times more omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids than U.S. commercial eggs.
• A 1998 study in Animal Feed Science and Technology found that pastured eggs had higher omega-3s and vitamin E than eggs from caged hens.
• A 1999 study by Barb Gorski at Pennsylvania State University found that eggs from pastured birds had 10 percent less fat, 34 percent less cholesterol, 40 percent more vitamin A, and four times the omega-3s compared to the standard USDA data. Her study also tested pastured chicken meat, and found it to have 21 percent less fat, 30 percent less saturated fat and 50 percent more vitamin A than the USDA standard.
• In 2003, Heather Karsten at Pennsylvania State University compared eggs from two groups of Hy-Line variety hens, with one kept in standard crowded factory farm conditions and the other on mixed grass and legume pasture. The eggs had similar levels of fat and cholesterol, but the pastured eggs had three times more omega-3s, 220 percent more vitamin E and 62 percent more vitamin A than eggs from caged hens.
• The 2005 study MOTHER EARTH NEWS conducted of four heritage-breed pastured flocks in Kansas found that pastured eggs had roughly half the cholesterol, 50 percent more vitamin E, and three times more beta carotene.